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NVMe support?

Western Digital Drives - The Preferred Drives of FreeNAS and TrueNAS CORE
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gork

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Cool, thank you. I will monitor the changes and hopefully look for this to be integrated.
 

cyberjock

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Who is going to buy (or give) me an NVMe controller to test? ;)
 

jgreco

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Who is going to buy (or give) me an NVMe controller to test? ;)
No one. Go buy your own.

Code:
nvd0: <INTEL SSDPEDMW400G4> NVMe namespace
nvd0: 381554MB (781422768 512 byte sectors)
 

cyberjock

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No one. Go buy your own.

Code:
nvd0: <INTEL SSDPEDMW400G4> NVMe namespace
nvd0: 381554MB (781422768 512 byte sectors)
$1000! Do you think I'm made of money!? LOL.
 

Something

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cyberjock

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Got anything you want to see tested?
Not specifically a model or brand. I would like to see stuff tested that's not overly expensive and by trusted brands like Intel, Crucial, Sandisk, etc.

If you want to know what test to run I can probably get some iozone commands for you so we can see how good/bad a given disk is for slog and/or l2arc.
 

HoneyBadger

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I can probably get some iozone commands for you so we can see how good/bad a given disk is for slog
I'm testing the "SLOG underprovisioning" theory right now, I'd like those iozone commands if you have a good set.

Edit: From this post I've got

Code:
iozone -r 4k -s 4G -i 0 -i 1 -i 2 -f -o /dev/adaX > /mnt/tank/testfile.txt


With the caveat that the -s sizing should be at least double system RAM, and obviously use the correct redirect target and /dev/adaX.

"Double system RAM" equals "I'll be back tomorrow. Maybe."
 
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miraculix

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Not specifically a model or brand. I would like to see stuff tested that's not overly expensive and by trusted brands like Intel, Crucial, Sandisk, etc.
This has got me hopeful. $200 for 256GB and $350 for 512GB Samsung 950 Pro NVMe M.2 2280 form factor drives.
 
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Something

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Not specifically a model or brand. I would like to see stuff tested that's not overly expensive and by trusted brands like Intel, Crucial, Sandisk, etc.

If you want to know what test to run I can probably get some iozone commands for you so we can see how good/bad a given disk is for slog and/or l2arc.
I would be happy to test some stuff, pass them along! Gonna need some time to setup the 750 though, happy to afterwards.

This has got me hopeful. $200 for 256GB and $350 for 512GB Samsung 950 Pro NVMe M.2 2280 form factor drives.
After the EVO and TLC...mishaps i'm leaning away from Sammy for SSDs. I own too many of their SSDs now and i'm not interested in more.

One other thing to consider, the 950 Pros are client-oriented, not enterprise. Something like an Intel 750 absolutely creams client and enterprise workloads. Also posts better random read/write IO numbers.

I'm not sure about how FreeNAS loads are though (anyone know what the queue depths are like?), so a 950 Pro may still be better. We shall see!
 

HoneyBadger

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Something

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Much appreciated, I'll go ahead and work on the drive tomorrow as I do other setup work then test it.
 

LubomirZ

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guys I'm sorry but Intel 750 is specified to have 70GB/day/5yr warranty = 70 x 365 x 5 = 127TB write endurance (with suicide thoughts after that, probably "to play it safe"") whereas Sammy950 is specified to have 400TBW endurance for 512GB model and 200TBW for 256GB model.

In my books, that's blatantly better than Intel 750. Enterprise-designation or not, it's MILES AHEAD of Intel write endurance.

We have seen Intel SSDs committing suicide after "I feel NAND wears out", on the other hand Samsung drives withstood much more writes than they are specified for so it's pretty real that instead of 400TB, you'll be able to write 20000TB - remember 3D V-NAND with huge huge huge cells plus no suicide. Samsung said they have 128GB 850Pro models in their labs that sustained terribly more than 8000TB of writes and with 4x nm litography I have absolutely no doubts to believe that. 512GB models have 4 times more cells so they must withstand at least 4 times more writes. Intel750 has what, 19nm ?

Make your own conclusions. I did.
 

HoneyBadger

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I can't find anything on the Samsung site stating that the 950 Pro has power loss protection. Kind of a major issue since if it has none then it immediately fails at being an SLOG device. I do like that they state IOPS at single-queue depth though since that's the determining factor for SLOG performance.
 

depasseg

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The Intel 750 is a Client based device. From Intel's spec sheet "Endurance Rating The SSD will have a minimum useful life based on a typical client workload assuming up to 70GB of host writes per day." Bolding is mine.

Compare this to a DC3700: "While running JESD218 standard1 and based on JESD219 workload (Refer to JESD218 standard table 1 for UBER, FFR and other Enterprise SSD endurance verification requirements. UBER design and majority of life target is 1E-17. Endurance verification acceptance criterion based on establishing <1E-16 at 60 confidence.) 100GB: 1.83 PBW 200GB: 3.65 PBW 400GB: 7.30 PBW 800GB: 14.60 PBW"
 

LubomirZ

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guys you are right - Sammy 950 doesn't have power loss protection. Extremely important if... you don't have UPS.

Only crazy people run their servers without any form of UPS protection - if you have FreeNAS storage with the best-on-the-market SSDs with capacitors, they are not worth a fart if all your servers, virtual machines, databases with opened transactions and running job simply crash down. Because they are not hooked to UPS, exactly as your storage is not, right ?

Intel 750 is very nice piece of hardware, no doubt about it. Endurance-wise, it's not better than than some competitors - to be honest, Intel750 is on the bottom of the game. I haven't seen price of Sammy 950 yet, that might be a problem. I have several PCI-e slots in servers, but I have no M.2 so for this usage case, 950Pro is out of the game and the game didn't even begin yet.

There are use cases. As always, as everywhere. When I wrote "make your own conclusions", I was not pushing towards any particular solution :)
 

depasseg

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guys you are right - Sammy 950 doesn't have power loss protection. Extremely important if... you don't have UPS.
Even WITH a UPS, power loss protection in an SSD device used as a SLOG is needed.
 

Something

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guys I'm sorry but Intel 750 is specified to have 70GB/day/5yr warranty = 70 x 365 x 5 = 127TB write endurance (with suicide thoughts after that, probably "to play it safe"") whereas Sammy950 is specified to have 400TBW endurance for 512GB model and 200TBW for 256GB model.

In my books, that's blatantly better than Intel 750. Enterprise-designation or not, it's MILES AHEAD of Intel write endurance.
Warrantied write endurance != actual write endurance.

http://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead

Yer gonna end up killing sectors (and thus NAND for storage) as time goes on past what it's rated for.

We have seen Intel SSDs committing suicide after "I feel NAND wears out", on the other hand Samsung drives withstood much more writes than they are specified for so it's pretty real that instead of 400TB, you'll be able to write 20000TB - remember 3D V-NAND with huge huge huge cells plus no suicide. Samsung said they have 128GB 850Pro models in their labs that sustained terribly more than 8000TB of writes and with 4x nm litography I have absolutely no doubts to believe that. 512GB models have 4 times more cells so they must withstand at least 4 times more writes. Intel750 has what, 19nm?

Make your own conclusions. I did.


The larger lithography has nothing to do with the P/E cycles or write endurance, it was for cost cutting. 3D NAND isn't cheap, much like HBM and other memory stacking.

There are very good reasons NAND has been using smaller and smaller processes with time, like RAM, CPUs, GPUs and basically everything else ever that's fabricated.

The Intel 750 is a Client based device. From Intel's spec sheet "Endurance Rating The SSD will have a minimum useful life based on a typical client workload assuming up to 70GB of host writes per day." Bolding is mine.

Compare this to a DC3700: "While running JESD218 standard1 and based on JESD219 workload (Refer to JESD218 standard table 1 for UBER, FFR and other Enterprise SSD endurance verification requirements. UBER design and majority of life target is 1E-17. Endurance verification acceptance criterion based on establishing <1E-16 at 60 confidence.) 100GB: 1.83 PBW 200GB: 3.65 PBW 400GB: 7.30 PBW 800GB: 14.60 PBW"
Its enterprise roots are reflected in its performance, notably its performance consistency. That was what I was referring to.

For anything of a more enterprise nature, it actually holds it own quite well and will surpass Sammy's client drives like the SP951.

Even WITH a UPS, power loss protection in an SSD device used as a SLOG is needed.
^^^^

There's a reason that this drive that costs $15,000 utilizes MRAM.
 
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HoneyBadger

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