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BUILD First NAS build - suggestions are welcome :-)

Western Digital Drives - The Preferred Drives of FreeNAS and TrueNAS CORE
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ajeje_brazo

Cadet
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
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The main purpose this build is to stream/transcode media, store music/photos, backup my computers.

I thought to use RAIDZ2 for data preservation (6x 4TB disks) and Plex Media server for media streaming.

This is the build that I have in mind:
  • CASE: Fractal Design Node 804
  • MOTHERBOARD: SuperMicro X10SLL-F
  • RAM: 16GB Samsung ECC Unbuffered - M391B1G73BH0-CK0
    • ~180$ - tested by SuperMicro
  • CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1200? v3
    • E3-1220L v3 (~193$, 13W, 1.1 GHz - turbo: 1.5 GHz)
    • E3-1240L v3 (~278$, 25W, 2 GHz - turbo: 3 GHz)
    • E3-1265L v3 (~294$, 45W, 2.5 GHz - turbo: 3.7 GHz)
    • E3-1265L v3 (~193$, 80W, 3.1 GHz - turbo: 3.5 GHz)
  • DRIVES: WD Red 4 TB
    • ~ 1020$
  • PSU: XFX - XTR Series 750 - 650 - 550 W
    • 100$
My concerns are mostly about the CPU and the PSU.
Plex Media Server CPU requirement is "Intel Core 2 Duo processor 2.4 GHz or better". I think the E3-1265L would be a safe choice, but I'd be happy to hear suggestions :smile:
I was thinking about a 650W PSU, would that be an overkill?

Looking forward your suggestion ;-)
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
17,948
The main purpose this build is to stream/transcode media, store music/photos, backup my computers.

I thought to use RAIDZ2 for data preservation (6x 4TB disks) and Plex Media server for media streaming.

This is the build that I have in mind:
  • CASE: Fractal Design Node 804
  • MOTHERBOARD: SuperMicro X10SLL-F
  • RAM: 16GB Samsung ECC Unbuffered - M391B1G73BH0-CK0
    • ~180$ - tested by SuperMicro
  • CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1200? v3
    • E3-1220L v3 (~193$, 13W, 1.1 GHz - turbo: 1.5 GHz)
    • E3-1240L v3 (~278$, 25W, 2 GHz - turbo: 3 GHz)
    • E3-1265L v3 (~294$, 45W, 2.5 GHz - turbo: 3.7 GHz)
    • E3-1265L v3 (~193$, 80W, 3.1 GHz - turbo: 3.5 GHz)
  • DRIVES: WD Red 4 TB
    • ~ 1020$
  • PSU: XFX - XTR Series750 - 650 - 550 W
    • 100$
My concerns are mostly about the CPU and the PSU.
Plex Media Server CPU requirement is "Intel Core 2 Duo processor 2.4 GHz or better". I think the E3-1265L would be a safe choice, but I'd be happy to hear suggestions :)
I was thinking about a 650W PSU, would that be an overkill?

Looking forward your suggestion ;-)

Let's start with the CPU:

The low-power CPUs are a pure waste of money. You pay more for less performance and the same power consumption. The non-low power versions will use the exact same power at idle and low loads, but have the headroom to perform better at high loads.
You want models that do not end with an L.

For a little more cash (10-20 bucks), you can upgrade to an X10SLM+-F, which has two Intel i210 GbE controllers instead of 1 i210 + PCH GbE controller (along with a few minor additions like two extra USB 3.0 ports).

I assume you're looking at 6 WD Reds, right? I typically recommend PSUs that allow for 30W per drive plus 60W for the rest of the system (plus whatever you need for exotic cooling solutions), so I suggest something along the lines of the Seasonic G-450 (same thing as the one you chose internally, but is available in 450W, which is more appropriate for this case).
 

Maturola

Explorer
Joined
Jun 26, 2014
Messages
85
I agreed with the above post..

Avoid the L version of xeons. they are waste. I am big fan of the E3-1230 V3 (I personally like the refresh E3-1231 V3 but you have to make sure the MOBO have the most recent BIOS to support it or you will be stuck).

On the power supply, the budget is around 300ish Watts, look for something that support as many SATA power as drive you are planning on using (either now or later). I am big fan of seasonics supplies, and as Eric said, the G series are right on the top of the list. the G-450 have 6 SATA connectors.
 

madik

Explorer
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
54
You can save some money on CPU If you would like so. The Xeons are Quad core cpus. I dont think that you need so many cores in NAS since its running most of the time in idle. Unless you plan to use lots of Virtualizations.

If Dual core will be enough for you I suggest you to look into Core i3 which are supporting ECC and works great on server boards.

There are also the Pentium CPUs thats are even cheaper and also supports ECC and work great on server boards. Only thing that Pentiums are missing that you would actually perhaps need at some point is support of AES-IN technology that greatly reduces CPU load with Encrypted pools which makes almost no impact on performance in comparison with non-Encrypted pools.

I believe that 300-350 W PSU is enough for 6 drives NAS.
 

Sir.Robin

Guru
Joined
Apr 14, 2012
Messages
553
Bare in mind a smaller PSU will work harder than an oversized one. Some PSU's even turn off their fan when the load is under 20-25%.

Personally i tend to do oversized PSU. My ESXi/NAS idles at 140W. I don't even think it ever goes over 200W, but my PSU is 650W and thats what i want. :)
 

madik

Explorer
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
54
Bear in mind a smaller PSU will work harder than an oversized one. Some PSU's even turn off their fan when the load is under 20-25%.

Personally i tend to do oversized PSU. My ESXi/NAS idles at 140W. I don't even think it ever goes over 200W, but my PSU is 650W and thats what i want. :)


On the other hand the the "oversized" PSUs works in less power efficient zone since they are running on around 10% load of the PSU. The power efficiency peak is around 50% of PSUs load. So the smaller PSU will work on higher efficiency and therefor build up less heat than "oversized" PSU. Of course its about specific models of PSU. Some 300W models also turns of fans in low loads..
 

Sir.Robin

Guru
Joined
Apr 14, 2012
Messages
553
Right. But i don't think that it's a big difference were talking about here, though i have no numbers to flash.

You also have the "max-current" draw under drive spin up (unless you are using sas drives and staggered spinup that actually works) .
And when you take into account that your future needs might change... as in upgrades of different types and the fact that the power rating will go down on any aging PSU, i think its fair to say you should at least account for "some" oversizing.

How much will be personal preference. :)
 

Z300M

Guru
Joined
Sep 9, 2011
Messages
882
I agreed with the above post..

Avoid the L version of xeons. they are waste. I am big fan of the E3-1230 V3 (I personally like the refresh E3-1231 V3 but you have to make sure the MOBO have the most recent BIOS to support it or you will be stuck).

On the power supply, the budget is around 300ish Watts, look for something that support as many SATA power as drive you are planning on using (either now or later). I am big fan of seasonics supplies, and as Eric said, the G series are right on the top of the list. the G-450 have 6 SATA connectors.
When I was looking for a new power supply, SeaSonic was one of the first brands I checked out, but the reviews on NewEgg.com of the one I had in mind (don't remember now which one it was) were not very favorable, so I ended up with a Rosewill 80 Plus Gold that got excellent reviews and has a long warranty.
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
17,948
When I was looking for a new power supply, SeaSonic was one of the first brands I checked out, but the reviews on NewEgg.com of the one I had in mind (don't remember now which one it was) were not very favorable, so I ended up with a Rosewill 80 Plus Gold that got excellent reviews and has a long warranty.

Wow. You were tricked by the reviews into trading an excellent PSU for a Piece of Shit.

You can't go wrong with Seasonic and Rosewill is generic crap at best and dangerous at worst.

NEVER trust PSU reviews made by some schmo who knows exactly nothing about electronic circuits. hardocp.com and jonnyguru.com are my favorite sites that review PSUs.
 

Z300M

Guru
Joined
Sep 9, 2011
Messages
882
Wow. You were tricked by the reviews into trading an excellent PSU for a Piece of Shit.

You can't go wrong with Seasonic and Rosewill is generic crap at best and dangerous at worst.

NEVER trust PSU reviews made by some schmo who knows exactly nothing about electronic circuits. hardocp.com and jonnyguru.com are my favorite sites that review PSUs.
Hardocp.com doesn't seem to have tested Rosewill PSUs. Jonnyguru.com's most recent test of a Rosewill PSU was in 2009. Another Web site (I think it was Tom's Hardware) said that many Rosewill PSUs have been inferior, the exception being the Capstone series -- which is what mine is.
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
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Feb 15, 2014
Messages
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Hardocp.com doesn't seem to have tested Rosewill PSUs. Jonnyguru.com's most recent test of a Rosewill PSU was in 2009. Another Web site (I think it was Tom's Hardware) said that many Rosewill PSUs have been inferior, the exception being the Capstone series -- which is what mine is.

Yeah, generic stuff often isn't tested by them (unless it's a potential fire hazard - those are fun to read). I did read that most of them were based on crummy platforms, some of them even overrated - can't remember where, though.
 

Maturola

Explorer
Joined
Jun 26, 2014
Messages
85
When I was looking for a new power supply, SeaSonic was one of the first brands I checked out, but the reviews on NewEgg.com of the one I had in mind (don't remember now which one it was) were not very favorable, so I ended up with a Rosewill 80 Plus Gold that got excellent reviews and has a long warranty.


Stay away from Rosewill unless your budget is very very limited. They are build from generic parts that sometime haven't pass the manufacture quality control or from parts that haven't been fully tested over temperature (Which are cheaper).

Seasonic or Crossair (which most of them are actually rebranded seasonics)
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
17,948
Stay away from Rosewill unless your budget is very very limited. They are build from generic parts that sometime haven't pass the manufacture quality control or from parts that haven't been fully tested over temperature (Which are cheaper).

Seasonic or Crossair (which most of them are actually rebranded seasonics)

Actually, among the ones still sold, only the AX (non-i) are built by Seasonic (They're Seasonic Platinums, the pre-platinum ones were X-series). The AXi are built by Flextronics (good, comparable with Seasonic), I assume the new HXi will be built by Flextronics, too, the CX and CS are China Well Technology (despite sounding like the shadiest OEM ever, they're ok - not very good, just ok - but priced to match their ok-ness). GS are CWT, too, I think. The RM series has three different manufacturers (I believe the lower wattages are CWT, but I don't remember the other ones). The last HX were Seasonic X-series, I believe.

In any case, right now, Seasonic is pretty much the safest, most reliable bet. Few come close to matching their quality (Superflower has been pretty good lately, and Delta is in a league of its own - those industrial customers pay a lot).
 
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